• Liz Publika

Event Spotlight: "UNRAVELED" Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art, A Group Show at The Untitled Space

#byLizPublika


What is women's work?


Some may be flabbergasted by the question. Others may shoot an answer right off the cuff. Either way, in an ever changing society, terms like these must be revisited, reevaluated, and — if they're no longer applicable — discarded. But to have a meaningful conversation around any topic, we must first have an open mind and the will to change our thought patterns in light of new information. And that's where art can help.


"Woman with Vase" by Melissa Zexter at The Untitled Space
"Woman with Vase" by Melissa Zexter at The Untitled Space

Curated by multi-disciplinary artist and gallerist Indira Cesarine, UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art opens at The Untitled Space on April 17th and features textile as well as fiber-based artworks by 40 female-identifying artists that “address our lived experience and history through the lens of women weaving, knotting, twining, plaiting, coiling, pleating, lashing, and interlacing.”


"Fibromatosis" by Dominique Vitali at The Untitled Space
"Fibromatosis" by Dominique Vitali at The Untitled Space

According to the exhibit’s Curatorial Statement:


“Textile art is one of the oldest art forms, dating back to prehistoric times. Despite early works of textiles such as embroideries and tapestries having been made by both men and women, the tradition of textiles and needlework evolved into that of ‘women's work’ and was not only dismissed as not ‘important’ but was literally banned from the high art world by the Royal Academy in the 18th century (circa 1769).”


In fact, the notion of women's work being insignificant was so widely accepted that throughout the 20th century much of the work performed by women — such as working on a family farm or sewing and weaving — was not included in official statistics on labour, effectively making it virtually invisible, though men doing the same work were considered employed as farmers or craftsmen.

"Marceil, Cynthia, and Ruth at the Piggly Wiggly" by Mary Tooley Parker at The Untitled Space
"Marceil, Cynthia, and Ruth at the Piggly Wiggly" by Mary Tooley Parker at The Untitled Space

Although each piece of art is a manifestation of the creator’s subjective experience or perspective, all of the works featured in UNRAVELED are deeply rooted in the history of feminism. Because women, throughout time and especially during the women’s movement, have used the skills they obtained from women’s work to fight for equality, representation, and respect, the artists pay homage to the legacy of that artistry.


"Fertile Goddess 1" by Indira Cesarine at The Untitled Space
"Fertile Goddess 1" by Indira Cesarine at The Untitled Space

The idea behind UNRAVELED aligns with Cesarine’s long-standing approach to art: “Through my exhibitions and artwork, I challenge the status quo, as well as tackle stereotypes and double standards. I draw from historical narratives in an effort to create empowering artwork that can have an impact on the viewer, be a catalyst for change or provide insight into history which may have been overlooked.”


"Carried Trauma 1" by Christy O'Connor at The Untitled Space
"Carried Trauma 1" by Christy O'Connor at The Untitled Space

Using natural as well as synthetic fibers, fabrics, and yarns, artists employed embroidery, felting, weaving, spinning, sewing, and braiding to create the impressive range of works. In their own ways, they “explore with gravity and humor our contemporary culture, its beauty, flaws, and idiosyncrasies through murals, assemblages, fragile and gestural threads, meditative, and metaphorical fibers.”


"Gems TV" by Mz Icar at The Untitled Space
"Gems TV" by Mz Icar at The Untitled Space

In order to change the stereotypes that get rooted into our schemas, we must learn to focus our attention on the words and actions of individuals. Although this simple truth may seem easy to accept and live by, the conversations happening around politics, race, religion, family, sexuality and gender — including the concept of women’s work — suggest that simple truths are hard to implement, and there is work to do.


"Cosmic Stargate" by Robin Kang at The Untitled Space
"Cosmic Stargate" by Robin Kang at The Untitled Space

Exhibiting Artists: Amber Doe, Carol Scavotto, Caroline Wayne, Christy O’Connor, Daniela Puliti, Delaney Conner, Dominique Vitali, Elise Drake, Elizabeth Miller, Hera Haesoo Kim, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jody MacDonald, Julia Brandão, Kathy Sirico, Katie Cercone, Katie Commodore, Katrina Majkut, Katy Itter, Kelly Boehmer, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lisa Federici, Marianne Fairbanks, Mary Tooley Parker, Melanie Fischer, Melissa Zexter, Mychaelyn Michalec, Mz Icar, Orly Cogan, Robin Kang, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Ruta Naujalyte, Sally Hewett, Sarah Blanchette, Sooo-z Mastopietro, Sophie Boggis-Rolfe, Stacy Isenbarger, Stephanie Eche, Victoria Selbach, and Winnie van der Rijn.


"Love Bite (Blue)" by Kelly Boehmer at The Untitled Space
"Love Bite (Blue)" by Kelly Boehmer at The Untitled Space

OPENING RECEPTION

April 17, 2021

VIP Preview 1pm – 3pm

Opening Reception 3pm - 8pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW


April 17 – May 28, 2021

45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013



Note* All of the event information and images are provided by our partners.



Feature Stories

VOL. 18 

ART of METAL

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